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November 7, 2013

Tags: Death's Dark Shadow; Requiem For An Assassin; The Terracotta Dog

I said I would look for another Andrea Camilleri book and I didn't have to look far. Seems I had one sitting on a bookshelf at home. I feel so guilty because books sit on my shelves and I forget they are even there since there's always another new book that I must read or at least have on my shelf. I've fallen so far behind in my reading. (sigh)
The Terracotta Dog by Andrea Camilleri was as good as the first book I read. A complex mystery with a heavy dose of humor. In this book the crime takes place fifty years in the past, but Inspector Montalbano can't give up on solving the crime even though he believes the murderer is probably already dead.
Requiem For An Assassin by Barry Eisler is fast moving but I dread when John Rain goes through his verbal angst about the women he loves, loved, or lost. In this book his buddy is kidnapped and tortured (he really doesn't seem to hold out for very long--then again I'm sure I'd be talking before they even put the towel on my face.) Rain then goes about killing people to save his buddy, although Rain acknowledges that the bad guys aren't going to permit either Rain or his buddy to survive.
Death's Dark Shadow by Sally Spencer was a bit of a disappointment. I've always enjoyed Sally Spencer's series about Sam Blackstone and this was the first time I read her Paniatowski series (Charlie Woodend series.) The premise is based on an older woman of Spanish descent being killed in a small village in England. The plot involves the dark years of Franco in Spain. One of the characters flees Spain with the gold and doesn't do much to change his appearance which I found hard to believe. He is also killed by someone that is close to him. I found the murderers motive suspect given the relationship. I enjoyed the book while reading it, but when I had finished I had many doubts about the motives of the characters.
BTW I've just found out that Sally Spencer is the pseudoym for Alan Rustige. Seems the publisher thought the books would sell better to women and required that Rustige use a female name. Kind of what happens in the Romance genre. Leigh Greenwood is one of the few male romance authors who uses his own name and has his photo on his website.